Released by ASCE-NCS.ORG on January 14, 2016

The National Capital Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) released the 2016 Report Card for D.C.’s Infrastructure on Thursday, January 14, 2016.

The report includes an evaluation of the District’s bridges, drinking water, energy, levees, parks, rail, roads, schools, solid waste, transit and wastewater.

D.C.'s Infrastructure received a "mediocre" grade. It is of only moderate quality; not very good. Because infrastructure has a direct impact on our lives every day—from the quality of water delivered through taps in our homes, to the condition of school buildings our children attend and to the condition and capacity of the roads and rails we travel on, those living or working in, and those governing D.C.'s infrastructure funding policies must invest adequately to safeguard its role that is vital to our economy, security, recreation, and safety.

Welcome and thank you for joining us today for the release of the 2016 Report Card for D.C.’s Infrastructure. I am Scott Wolf, the President of the National Capital Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers.

Civil engineers are the caretakers of infrastructure. We are responsible for the design, construction, operation and maintenance of our core infrastructure, such as roads, bridges, water pipes and levees. With that responsibility comes the obligation to periodically assess the overall state of the infrastructure, report on its condition and performance, and advise on steps to improve it. Using a simple A to F school report card format, the 2016 Report Card for D.C.’s Infrastructure is our report for the citizens and leaders of D.C. that simplifies all the technical details about the condition of our infrastructure into a grade and facts that we want everyone to understand. Today, the 2016 Report Card for D.C.’s Infrastructure gives a grade for D.C.’s infrastructure and recommendation for how to raise the grades in the future.

As our organization is celebrating our Centennial Anniversary, we have now reviewed the infrastructure that is often as old as our chapter, and while what we see is challenging, as civil engineers who live and work in D.C., the National Capital Section of ASCE believes the next 100 years for D.C. infrastructure are filled with opportunities to rehabilitate and innovate to raise our infrastructure grades.

I now want to invite Ranjit Sahai, the chair of the Report Card Committee, to share the findings of the 2016 Report Card for D.C.’s Infrastructure.